Make Your Editor Cry: In Route or On Route vs. En Route

Make Your Editor Cry: In Route or On Route vs. En Route

The phrase en route which means “on or along the way” is borrowed from the French and has been in common use in English since at least the mid-18th century.

The phrase en route is the correct combination of words in the English language while in route or on route are just confused phrases, likely eggcorns, that are considered grammatically incorrect.

It’s usually used as an adverb.

Examples:

I finished my homework en route to school.
We stopped to eat en route to the museum.

And sometimes it can be used as an adjective.

Example:

Drivers on the gridlocked Fourth Avenue may experience some en route delays.

Never use in route or on route. Or if you do, at least dry my tears.

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