Make Your Editor Cry: All Ready vs. Already

Make Your Editor Cry:  All Ready vs. Already

All ready” is a phrase meaning “completely prepared,” as in “As soon as I put my coat on, I’ll be all ready.”

“Already,” however, is an adverb used to describe something that has happened before a certain time, as in “What do you mean you’d rather stay home? I thought you already left.”

All ready is a phrase meaning “completely prepared” for something.

Examples:

As soon as I grab my purse, I’ll be all ready.
Is everything all ready for the welcome home party?

Already is an adverb used to describe something that has happened prior to a specified or implied past, present, or future time. It can also mean by this time or previously.

Examples:

He had already left when I called.
He already agreed to come.
I'd already left by the time you called.

It can also be used as an intensifier.

Examples:

All right!All right already!
Enough already!

Obviously, “All ready” and “Already” are not interchangeable and should not be confused.

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