Make Your Editor Cry: (LATIN) ibid. and id.

Make Your Editor Cry: (LATIN) ibid. and id.

The abbreviation “ibid.,” stands for the Latin word “ibidem,” which means “in the same place.” It is used in endnotes or footnotes when you cite the same source and page number(s) two or more times. If you cite the same source but a different page number, you can use “ibid.” followed by a comma and the page number(s).

Note that “ibid.,” is capitalized when it begins a note just like any proper noun. Also note that it is (at the risk of repeating myself), an abbreviation which means that that it always ends in period and is always immediately followed by a comma if it is not the last word of the sentence or phrase.

Examples:

1. Lewis, C. S. (1960). Mere Christianity. New York: Macmillan, 99-101.
2. Ibid.
3. Ibid., 97.

The abbreviation “id.” stands for the Latin word “idem,” which means “the same person.” Although it is becoming less common, you may encounter the abbreviation “id.” used in a way similar to “ibid.” It is used in place of “ibid.” when the same author is cited but not the same page number. In such instances, “ibid.” is only used to repeat the preceding citation exactly.

Like “ibid.,” the word “id.,” is capitalized when it begins a note and as an abbreviation it always ends in period and is always immediately followed by a comma if it is not the last word of the sentence or phrase.

Example:

1. Lewis, C. S. (1960). Mere Christianity. New York: Macmillan, 99-101.
2. Ibid.
3. Id., 97.

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