Make Your Editor Cry: Case And Point vs. Case In Point

Make Your Editor Cry:  Case And Point vs. Case In Point

If you’ve just finished a flawless argument, the last thing you want to do to cap off your brilliance is trip up an idiom with an eggcorn.

The intended meaning of the idiom is to direct attention to the fact that the present entire case (situation or argument) lends credence to, and supports, your main point. That is, that it demonstrate how the entire case lies in the final specific point.

The intent is not to have both a case and a—potentially separate and unrelated—point.

The correct expression is case in point.

Example:

This week's game is a case in point.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

What is 7 + 6 ?
Please leave these two fields as-is:
IMPORTANT! To be able to proceed, you need to solve the following simple math (so we know that you are a human) :-)