Make Your Editor Cry: All be it vs. Albeit

Make Your Editor Cry:  All be it vs. Albeit

Albeit is a single word meaning “although” or “even though”. It should not be broken up into three separate words as all be it just as “although” is not broken up into multiple words like “all though.”

Evidence indicates that “albeit,” was first recorded in English in the fourteenth century, and albeit its use admittedly declined (see what I did there?) during the nineteenth century, it never really went out of use. Use of albeit has increased considerably since the 1930s according to Merriam-Webster.

It comes from Middle English, letter for letter, and literally meant “all though it be.” Chiefly British words like howbeit, whereas, and whilst share a similar heritage which, possibly coincidentally, are all passable synonyms for albeit.

Examples:

Incorrect:

We took an enjoyable, all be it expensive, vacation.

Correct:

We took an enjoyable, albeit expensive, vacation.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

What is 5 + 7 ?
Please leave these two fields as-is:
IMPORTANT! To be able to proceed, you need to solve the following simple math (so we know that you are a human) :-)